Atom used in radiocarbon dating

When an element undergoes radioactive decay, it creates radiation and turns into some other element.

This means that as more of these atoms decay you have a lower rate of radioactive decay. If you roll a one, then that object decays and turns into something else.

Age determinations can also be obtained from carbonate deposits such as calcite, dissolved carbon dioxide, and carbonates in ocean, lake, and groundwater sources.

Cosmic rays enter the earth's atmosphere in large numbers every day and when one collides with an atom in the atmosphere, it can create a secondary cosmic ray in the form of an energetic neutron.

Other corrections must be made to account for the proportion of throughout the biosphere (reservoir effects).

Additional complications come from the burning of fossil fuels such as coal and oil, and from the above-ground nuclear tests done in the 1950s and 1960s.

Atom used in radiocarbon dating